Jewish History Soundbites
United We Split: The Leadership of Rav Yosef Tzvi Dushinsky

United We Split: The Leadership of Rav Yosef Tzvi Dushinsky

September 18, 2022

Rav Yosef Tzvi Dushinsky (1867-1948) was the rabbi of the Eidah Chareidis community in Yerushalayim & headed the branch of Agudas Yisrael in that country for 15 crucial and tumultuous years. Having grown up in Hungary, he had previously served as rabbi of Galanta and Chust (Slovakia) for four decades. In Yerushalayim he oversaw the sweeping changes which were taking place in the Yishuv with immigration, the Great Arab Revolt, the policies of the British Mandatory government, World War II, the Holocaust, the UN Partition Resolution and the founding of the State of Israel. As a responsible and outspoken leader, Rav Dushinsky courageously led his community through this unique era, and aside from his rabbinical duties - along with his position as rosh yeshiva in the yeshiva which he founded - he took an active political role as well.

Ultimately the changing demographics due to the immigration of more moderate Agudists from Poland in Germany led to a split between the Eidah Chareidis and Agudas Yisrael, which was overseen by Rav Dushinsky and remains to this very day. Following his passing in 1948 he was succeeded by his only son Rav Yisroel Moshe Dushinsky (1921-2003), who built the Dushinsky community around the yeshiva and transformed it from an Ashkenaz Oberland community into a full Chassidic court.

 

For sponsorship opportunities about your favorite topics of Jewish history contact Yehuda at:  yehuda@yehudageberer.com

 

Subscribe To Our Podcast on: 

PodBean: https://jsoundbites.podbean.com/

Follow us on Twitter or Instagram at @Jsoundbites

You can email Yehuda at yehuda@yehudageberer.com

The Royals & The Jews

The Royals & The Jews

September 10, 2022

The Jewish People have had a long relationship with British royalty. From the expulsion of the Jews from England by King Edward I in 1290 to the resettlement which continued despite King Charles II returning to the throne in 1660. From Queen Victoria’s knighting Sir Moses Montefiore, to King George VI and his overseeing the end of the British Mandate on Palestine. From Princess Alice risking her life to saving Jews in Greece during the Holocaust to Queen Elizabeth II receiving Holocaust survivors on the 60th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. Though Queen Elizabeth II never visited the State of Israel, the Jewish community of Britain enjoyed a warm relationship with the royal family in recent history.

Check out these related episodes:

Jews of London Part I: https://jsoundbites.podbean.com/e/british-royals-baalei-tosfos-blood-libels-the-story-of-london-part-i/

Jews of London Part II: https://jsoundbites.podbean.com/e/from-cromwell-to-montefiore-the-jews-of-london-part-ii/

 

For sponsorship opportunities about your favorite topics of Jewish history contact Yehuda at:  yehuda@yehudageberer.com

 

Subscribe To Our Podcast on: 

PodBean: https://jsoundbites.podbean.com/

Follow us on Twitter or Instagram at @Jsoundbites

You can email Yehuda at yehuda@yehudageberer.com

On the Cusp of Modernity: The Noda B’yehuda

On the Cusp of Modernity: The Noda B’yehuda

September 4, 2022

The Jewish world of the 18th century was at the nexus of internal and external transformative events which would lead into the modern era. Political changes included the effects of the Seven Years War in central Europe and the partitions of Poland to the east. Internal Jewish disputes such as the Get of Kleves and the Rav Emden Rav Eybeschutz controversy, were accompanied by the challenges presented by the remnants of the Sabbatean movement, the spread of the nascent Chassidic movement and the early Haskala.

With a leadership career spanning the majority of this tempestuous century, Rav Yechezkal Landau (1713-1793), the Noda B’yehuda, rose to the occasion navigating through the turbulent waters which the Jewish community faced throughout. World renowned as a posek, he also ran a yeshiva and exhibited prodigious leadership skills both internally as well as with the government of Austria. 

 

For sponsorship opportunities about your favorite topics of Jewish history contact Yehuda at:  yehuda@yehudageberer.com

 

Subscribe To Our Podcast on: 

PodBean: https://jsoundbites.podbean.com/

Follow us on Twitter or Instagram at @Jsoundbites

You can email Yehuda at yehuda@yehudageberer.com

A Light in the Darkness: Rav Levi Yitzchak Schneerson

A Light in the Darkness: Rav Levi Yitzchak Schneerson

August 17, 2022

Rav Levi Yitzchak Schneerson (1878-1944), father of the Lubavitcher Rebbe Rav Menachem Mendel Schneerson, served as rabbi in Yekaterinoslav in the Soviet Union. As he valiantly attempted to maintain traditional Jewish life under increasingly challenging conditions under the communist regime, he succeeded in opening a mikva, baking matzos, answered halachic queries, collected charity and distributed it to the needy, kept the shul open for services and celebrated the Jewish holidays with his community. 

These illegal and anti Soviet activities eventually led to his arrest and interrogation at the hands of the NKVD in 1939. They didn’t succeed in breaking him during lengthy interrogations, and the transcripts of the NKVD on his file serve as an invaluable resource to understanding the narrative of his arrest and eventual exile. Sentenced to five years of exile in far away Chili, Kazakhstan, he was soon joined by his wife Rebbetzin Chana, who cared for him as his health deteriorated and they often faced starvation during their long years of isolation. Her memoirs provide another invaluable window into the tribulations which they sustained during this challenging time. He passed away on 20 Av, 1944 in Almaty, Kazakhstan. 

 

For sponsorship opportunities about your favorite topics of Jewish history contact Yehuda at:  yehuda@yehudageberer.com

 

Subscribe To Our Podcast on: 

PodBean: https://jsoundbites.podbean.com/

Follow us on Twitter or Instagram at @Jsoundbites

You can email Yehuda at yehuda@yehudageberer.com

1897: A Year of Transition

1897: A Year of Transition

August 13, 2022

Though change is generally a gradual process through history, it’s worth noting how several momentous events which were indicators of a dynamic Jewish community all occurred during the year 1897. The first Zionist Congress in Basel, Switzerland, the founding of the socialist Bund political party in Vilna, the Pulmoss Hamussar in Lithuania and the founding of the Tomchei Temimim Yeshiva of Chabad in Lubavitch. Are these seemingly unrelated events which differ so much in ideology, goals and constituency at all connected? Or do all four separate events indicate some unifying trends taking place in the volatile situation the Jewish People found themselves within as the 19th century came to a close?

 

Check out some great art: Twitter @ilanblock ; Insta@ silanblock

Whatsapp 908-239-9161 ; Email ilanblock@gmail.com

 

For sponsorship opportunities about your favorite topics of Jewish history contact Yehuda at:  yehuda@yehudageberer.com

 

Subscribe To Our Podcast on: 

PodBean: https://jsoundbites.podbean.com/

Follow us on Twitter or Instagram at @Jsoundbites

You can email Yehuda at yehuda@yehudageberer.com

The Working Group & its Desperate Rescue Attempts

The Working Group & its Desperate Rescue Attempts

August 5, 2022

The Slovakian Working Group was likely the most heroic attempt at Jewish rescue during the Holocaust. Dealing directly with the SS and their Slovak collaborators, members of the Working Group bribed the perpetrators, smuggled goods and Jews across borders and disseminated information regarding the development of the Final Solution to Switzerland and Hungary.

Representing the full gamut of Slovakian Jewry, the Working Group included Gisi Fleischmann of the Zionist movement who was also a representative of the Joint Distribution Committee, Rav Michoel Ber Weissmandel who represented the Orthodox community, the Zionist leader Dr. Oskar Neumann, the Neolog rabbi Armin Freider, and the assimilationists Dr. Tibor Kovac and Andrej Steiner. Together they formulated ever daring plans to save Jews. Though most of their plans didn’t come to fruition, their heroism stands as the most daring attempt to save Jewish lives during the Holocaust.

 

To dedicate an episode in the Jewish History Soundbites ‘Jewish Saviors of the Holocaust’ series, please contact Yehuda at yehuda@yehudageberer.com 

 

With Tisha B'Av approaching, check out Aleph Beta's collection of inspiring Tisha B'Av videos. Rabbi David Fohrman, founder of Aleph Beta, explores some of the most beloved Tisha B'Av texts to discover the deeper meaning and relevance of the day. 

 

And for a limited time only, our listeners get $18 off an annual Aleph Beta membership, which will give you access to all the Tisha b’av videos plus hundreds more on parsha and the other holidays. Go to Aleph Beta and enter coupon code Soundbites22 for $18 off an annual premium membership.

 

For sponsorship opportunities about your favorite topics of Jewish history contact Yehuda at:  yehuda@yehudageberer.com

 

Subscribe To Our Podcast on: 

 

PodBean: https://jsoundbites.podbean.com/

 

Follow us on Twitter or Instagram at @Jsoundbites

You can email Yehuda at yehuda@yehudageberer.com

From Young Rosh Yeshiva to Senior Sage: Rav Isser Zalman Meltzer Part II

From Young Rosh Yeshiva to Senior Sage: Rav Isser Zalman Meltzer Part II

July 28, 2022

Rav Isser Zalman Meltzer (1870-1953) was a great Torah leader of the 20th century, whose life story spanned eras and continents. As a young teenager he studied in the vaunted Volozhin Yeshiva, then married into the prestigious Frank family of Kovno, where he subsequently was appointed rosh yeshiva of Slabodka. This was followed by his departure for Slutzk where he remained as rosh yeshiva and later as communal rabbi for decades.

Following the formation of the Soviet Union and the challenges of maintaining religious life therein, he immigrated to Palestine in 1925. There he assumed the leadership of the Eitz Chaim yeshiva and served in several leadership positions in both the yishuv and later in Israel, where he oversaw the growth of the emerging Torah community.

 

To dedicate an episode in the Jewish History Soundbites ‘Jewish Saviors of the Holocaust’ series, please contact Yehuda at yehuda@yehudageberer.com 

 

Jewish History Soundbites is coming to NY! Register here for the upcoming tour of the Mt. Judah cemetery with Yehuda Geberer on July 29, 9:30 am

 

For sponsorship opportunities about your favorite topics of Jewish history contact Yehuda at:  yehuda@yehudageberer.com

 

Subscribe To Our Podcast on: 

 

PodBean: https://jsoundbites.podbean.com/

 

Follow us on Twitter or Instagram at @Jsoundbites

You can email Yehuda at yehuda@yehudageberer.com

From Slabodka to Slutzk: Rav Isser Zalman Meltzer Part I

From Slabodka to Slutzk: Rav Isser Zalman Meltzer Part I

July 25, 2022

Rav Isser Zalman Meltzer (1870-1953) was a great Torah leader of the 20th century, whose life story spanned eras and continents. As a young teenager he studied in the vaunted Volozhin Yeshiva, then married into the prestigious Frank family of Kovno, where he subsequently was appointed rosh yeshiva of Slabodka. This was followed by his departure for Slutzk where he remained as rosh yeshiva and later as communal rabbi for decades.

Following the formation of the Soviet Union and the challenges of maintaining religious life therein, he immigrated to Palestine in 1925. There he assumed the leadership of the Eitz Chaim yeshiva and served in several leadership positions in both the yishuv and later in Israel, where he oversaw the growth of the emerging Torah community.

 

To dedicate an episode in the Jewish History Soundbites ‘Jewish Saviors of the Holocaust’ series, please contact Yehuda at yehuda@yehudageberer.com 

 

Jewish History Soundbites is coming to NY! Register here for the upcoming tour of the Mt. Judah cemetery with Yehuda Geberer on July 29, 9:30 am

 

For sponsorship opportunities about your favorite topics of Jewish history contact Yehuda at:  yehuda@yehudageberer.com

 

Subscribe To Our Podcast on: 

 

PodBean: https://jsoundbites.podbean.com/

 

Follow us on Twitter or Instagram at @Jsoundbites

You can email Yehuda at yehuda@yehudageberer.com

Jewish Saviors of the Holocaust Part III: The Sobibor Revolt

Jewish Saviors of the Holocaust Part III: The Sobibor Revolt

July 17, 2022

Within the framework of Operation Reinhard, the Nazi extermination of Polish Jewry, the SS built three death camps in Eastern Poland - Belzec, Treblinka & Sobibor. The latter was the smallest of the three, and a quarter of a million primarily Polish and Dutch Jews were killed in its gas chambers during its year and a half of existence. It was at Sobibor that on October 14, 1943 a great prisoner escape took place. Led by the son of a Polish rabbi named Leon Feldhendler & a Soviet Jewish Red Army officer named Sasha Pechersky, these two unlikely leaders joined together to formulate a plan to save not just themselves but to give all of the 600 inmates at Sobibor an equal chance to escape.

The revolt killed several SS officers, 300 Jewish prisoners made it to the forest and nearly 50 survived the war. As they broke for the fences, Pechersky demanded that anyone who survive should tell the world what went on in Sobibor. 

 

To dedicate an episode in the Jewish History Soundbites ‘Jewish Saviors of the Holocaust’ series, please contact Yehuda at yehuda@yehudageberer.com 

 

Jewish History Soundbites is coming to NY! Register here for the upcoming tour of the Mt. Judah cemetery with Yehuda Geberer on July 29, 9:30 am

 

For sponsorship opportunities about your favorite topics of Jewish history contact Yehuda at:  yehuda@yehudageberer.com

 

Subscribe To Our Podcast on: 

 

PodBean: https://jsoundbites.podbean.com/

 

Follow us on Twitter or Instagram at @Jsoundbites

You can email Yehuda at yehuda@yehudageberer.com

Jewish Saviors of the Holocaust Part II: From a Tunnel in Novogrudok to the Bielski Partisans

Jewish Saviors of the Holocaust Part II: From a Tunnel in Novogrudok to the Bielski Partisans

July 14, 2022

On the night of September 26, 1943 232 Jews escaped through a tunnel from the Novogrudok Ghetto. Nearly 170 survived, primarily by joining the Bielski partisans who operated nearby in the Naliboki forest. This was likely the greatest escape in Nazi occupied Europe throughout the entire war and Holocaust.

The tenacity and courage of the last Jews of the Novogrudok ghetto to dig a 250 meter tunnel leading to the forest, combined with the capability of joining Tuvia Bielski and his partisans, facilitated one of the most astounding stories of Jewish survival during the Holocaust. Tuvia Bielski famously said that he prioritizes saving lives over killing Germans. The result was that his partisan unit was a family camp which saved over 1,200 Jews, among them the escapees of the Novogrudok tunnel. 

 

To dedicate an episode in the Jewish History Soundbites ‘Jewish Saviors of the Holocaust’ series, please contact Yehuda at yehuda@yehudageberer.com 

 

Jewish History Soundbites is coming to NY! Register here for the upcoming tour of the Mt. Judah cemetery with Yehuda Geberer on July 29, 9:30 am

 

For sponsorship opportunities about your favorite topics of Jewish history contact Yehuda at:  yehuda@yehudageberer.com

 

Subscribe To Our Podcast on: 

 

PodBean: https://jsoundbites.podbean.com/

 

Follow us on Twitter or Instagram at @Jsoundbites

You can email Yehuda at yehuda@yehudageberer.com

Podbean App

Play this podcast on Podbean App